25 October 2016 – Bird Studies Canada recently hosted the 10th anniversary reception of the Long Point Causeway Improvement Project. This partnership has been helping to restore the health and function of Long Point’s marshes, and reducing wildlife mortality along the causeway traversing them. Over $2.5 million from government and non-government resources in Canada and the U.S. has funded the installation of wildlife fencing, two water culverts, and 12 wildlife transit tunnels (eco-passages) over the past 10 years. Previously, the 3.5-km road was one of the deadliest for reptiles and amphibians in North America, but studies show roadkill is down 80% since the improvements started.

longpointaerialview.jpg

Bird Studies Canada’s long-standing advisor on the project, Jon McCracken, notes, “The Causeway was built in 1927. If such a road – which spans some of the world’s most important wetlands – was proposed today, it would be an elevated roadway. Our only choice now is to try to mitigate impact and minimize roadkill losses. This project has been doing exactly that. We’ve also been restoring important ecological wetland connections on both sides of the road, which are good for birds and fishes too.” This is an excellent example of the many advisory roles our staff perform across Canada.